Title
An Aerial View - El Dorado Hills
The community of El Dorado Hills is symbolic of the growth in population within the Mother Lode. It quite literally grew from nothing but the rolling hills of the Sierra foothills beginning in the 1960s into the planned community pictured below in 2009.

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El Dorado Hills


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Open the El Dorado Hills - Aerial Views map. Click the checkbox next to any one of the four years listed in the legend to open an aerial view of El Dorado Hills for that year.

Print a copy of the Aerial View worksheet. It provides a graphic means of organizing and interpreting what you see as you study the aerial photos of El Dorado Hills. Complete the example for 1968 started for you and then move on to the photos of the other years recording your observations and interpretations.

To Start You Thinking

1) El Dorado Hills was little more than a plan in 1968 as you can see in scanning the photos. Work backwards from today and find the first evidence you see of a high school over the years. Explain how you know that it is a school.

2) Describe how the vegetation of the area has changed over the years.

3) Turn off all of the aerial image layers, switch to the Imagery basemap,and explore the contemporary satelite view. Locate El Dorado Hills Golf Course (You may have to zoom in a bit.).

a) Identify the features that allow you to identify this location as a golf course.

 

b) Review the historical aerial photos. Approximately how long has the golf course been in existence? Explain.

 

c) Discuss the condition of the course today compared to the past.

4) Parks and recreation were a planned part of El Dorado Hills. Describe the evidence you see of city parks and how they have changed over the years.

 

 

Last modified in April, 2017 by Rick Thomas